Tag Archives: school lunch around the world

Summer in the school garden

Our veggie garden at home has been a disappointment this year. Combine a heat wave with vacation, sparse planting and greater attention to keeping cats away than planning, and we’ve got a sorry state of affairs out there. Luckily, the school garden has fared much better.

Screen Shot 2013-08-22 at 9.50.49 AMWe focused on veggies that reflect the diversity of our school community this year and we’ve had a bumper crop of kolhrabi,

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edamame beans,

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purple cauliflower,Screen Shot 2013-08-22 at 9.50.37 AM

and, of course, the usual beans,Screen Shot 2013-08-22 at 9.49.48 AMand tomatoes.

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 Lots and lots of tomatoes.

The children at the school also asked for more flowers in their patch. We had to oblige, of course. With sunflowers,

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and some brilliantly coloured nasturiums.

Screen Shot 2013-08-22 at 9.49.38 AMI can’t wait until we tell the kids that those flowers they wanted are also delicious in a salad!

All photos by Andrea Curtis

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What’s for Lunch in South Korea?

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Some great What’s for Lunch? news arrived on my doorstep when I returned from holiday this week. What’s for Lunch? is available in South Korea!

Like so many children around the world, kids in South Korea have a daily hot meal at school. Lunch is served in a metal tray with multiple compartments and always includes rice and kimchi (pickled vegetables). There’s also a protein (chicken, fish, egg, tofu, but often it’s octopus or squid!), usually served stewed or boiled, plus more veggie sides such as eggplant, radish, bean sprouts or lotus root. Soup is also offered some days.

There are some great photos of South Korean school lunches on this teacher’s Tumblr blog.

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 11.34.44 AM To give a sense of just how important the issue is in South Korea, a couple of years ago, the city of  Seoul held a very contentious referendum about school lunch. Some members of municipal government had the foresight to push for healthy, free school meals for all of the 800,000-plus primary and middle school kids in the city’s public schools. Of course, such a proposal is costly ($380 million a year, according to this piece in Time) and the program faced opposition from Conservative members of council, including the mayor. (There was even a brawl in council chambers over the issue!)

As I’ve argued many times before, of course, I think the economic and social benefits of school lunch are vast and far-reaching in better health and school performance, among other things. Seems citizens of Seoul agreed (though voter turnout was low) and the universal free school lunch program was passed. The mayor resigned in frustration.

I hope kids and teachers in South Korea feel as strongly as some of their policy makers and I do about the positive impact of school lunch (no brawling, please!). And I look forward to hearing what they think about the lovely hardcover, brand-spanking new Korean version of my book!

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They like it!

Screen Shot 2013-06-07 at 6.01.39 PMFor a writer, there’s  nothing better than hearing from a reader that they liked your book. So when I heard that a whole bunch of readers—kid readers—decided to name What’s for Lunch? their favourite English nonfiction book of the year, I was pretty excited.

Seems the librarians and students in the Riverside School Board in Quebec, near Montreal, started a new literary prize to (in their words) “promote Canadian literary culture and nurture a love of reading.” They call it Riverside Sparks and I am delighted and honoured to be one of the first recipients of this new annual award.

I am especially pleased because I know what tough critics kids can be—not to mention the notion that I might have a small part in nurturing a love of reading (one of my favourite projects). I wrote What’s for Lunch? hoping that reading about what other kids are doing would inspire children to take charge of their school lunch and the food system. Now these kids are inspiring me!

What’s for Lunch? will be available in all Riverside schools next year.

The book has also been recently recognized with the Stepping Stones Honor Award, given by the multicultural magazine of the same name. The award is intended to “promote respect for the ecological richness and cultural diversity of the world.”  And What’s for Lunch? is a longlist nominee for the 2013 Information Book Award from the Children’s Literature Roundtables of Canada.

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Sign of the times

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Give peas a chance

The school garden is planted, and the year nearly done. In our third year of growing an edible veggie patch, we’re really seeing pickup on the part of the kids, parents and teachers in our community. It’s not that they didn’t respond before, but there’s something different about it this year, a feeling that the garden is part of the social, emotional and academic environment—not just the physical one. There are many kids who’ve never known the school without a garden. They feel tremendous ownership of it, reminding each other to be careful, where the peas, basil or radishes are planted, and they come out for our weekly tending and watering “party.”

There are lots of reasons for this change—the main one being the awesome teachers at the school who embed it into their work in the classroom—but one of the things that has also helped is that there are now colourful signs made by the children explaining what’s happening in the patch.

Screen Shot 2013-06-06 at 9.44.07 AM Last year, with the support of teachers and a local artist, they created collage images illustrating garden-specific concepts like A Plant’s Life, Beneficial Insects, Compost and the Three Sisters (corn, beans, squash) Plot we’ve planted. They also researched and wrote up text to accompany their images. With foundation funding, we had weather resistant signs made. Now kids can go with their teachers and discuss the material as part of an outdoor class, or just read the beautiful posters with their parents or friends.

Screen Shot 2013-06-06 at 9.43.42 AM The signs serve to beautify the playground, mark the garden as a place of kid-centred and kid-led learning and emphasize food literacy in the school.

The sign idea was inspired by a school in Oakland California that I posted about a few years ago here. I’d love to hear what you are doing in your school garden to emphasize food literacy or just make it a more fun and inviting place. Comment here and I’ll post about some of the ideas soon.

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FREE teacher’s resources

What’s for Lunch? was created for kids, their parents and teachers to initiate discussions about food and the way it connects to so many issues that we all care about. Things like the environment, poverty, hunger, our health and the health of our communities.

cafeteria-tray.pngBut reading the book is just the beginning. I hope families and educators will use it as a bouncing-off point for more in-depth discussions. That’s why, with the help of my publisher, Red Deer Press, I’ve created a FREE Teaching Guide for use in classrooms everywhere. The guide has questions aimed at initiating talk about what kids eat around the world, teaching ideas inspired by the book’s content, blacklines for easy printout—all downloadable here. (It’s about 5 MB.)

There are curriculum connections to health and nutrition, environmental sustainability, diversity, urban/rural connections, media education and much more. From the Pizza Pie game to Untangling the Food System to a more in-depth session we call The Lottery of Life, I hope these resources will inspire teachers to bring the ideas in What’s for Lunch? into their classroom. I’d love to hear how it goes. Email me (andrea at andreacurtis dot ca) and let me know!

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On the blog roll

As I gear up for my next book to come out in mid-March (check it out here)—with all the trepidation and excitement that entails— it’s particularly nice to see blogger reviews still coming in for What’s for Lunch?

I’m also doing a number of talks and presentations about the book with both children and adults over the next few months. If you want me to come to your school or community group, you can contact me about fees and my availability.

final WFL coverJust this week, obesity doc Yoni Freedhoff posted a review of the book on his blog Weighty Matters. He liked What’s for Lunch? quite a bit though he had some really interesting stuff to say about how obesity is framed in the text.

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The global kitchen

A chilly view from the high line

A chilly view from the High Line

I spent this past weekend on a mini vacation in New York City walking and exploring and eating, as well as talking about food with school lunch and food justice (super)hero, Jan Poppendieck, who wrote the brilliant Sweet Charity? about the failures of food banking, and the more recent (and equally brilliant) Free for All: Fixing School Food in America.

The weekend was a literal smorgasbord of fun, food and inspiration. One of the surprise highlights was stumbling on the new food exhibit at the Museum of Natural History. Called Our Global Kitchen, it uses multimedia, display, historical objects, diaroma and even taste tests to bring to life the complexity of our food system, the future of food (think seaweed, bugs and less meat) and the joys of eating together. There’s a chance to sit at a table with a Roman aristocrat, see an ancient Aztec marketplace and cook up various recipes on an interactive table/screen.

our global kitchenCurated by the Center for Biodiversity Conservation, the exhibit pulls no punches about the challenges of feeding a projected 9 billion people by 2050 or the profound problems with current industrial agricultural practices.

Considering the equivocating I seem to read in the media about this (as if it’s still sane to question climate change or the failures of the so-called green revolution to feed the world), I was delighted to see how matter of fact the exhibit is. This is science, baby.

I can’t wait to read my friend Sarah Elton’s upcoming book, Consumed: Sustainable Food for a Finite Planet for more on this subject.

(For teachers and educators who can’t make it to New York before the show closes in August, there are downloadable teaching resources for all grades that touch on issues in the food system like biodiversity, the supply chain and trade, hunger and diet-related health issues. The resources are pegged to the exhibit itself but there are lots of ideas about how to bring these topics into the classroom.)

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