Teaching food literacy

When you’re deeply immersed in a subject, it can sometimes seem as if everything is connected to it. I remember when I was writing my first book, Into the Blue, and every conversation I had seemed to be somehow related to the themes I was exploring. It was thrilling—a kind of revelation, as if the apparently diffuse world of ideas had somehow—conveniently—coalesced around my interests. Of course, it wasn’t exactly true in a global sense, just true for me at that time.

Right now, I’m in the middle of writing another (adult) book about food and food politics—my second book about food in 2 years—and once again it seems to me as if the ideas and themes I’m so engaged in thinking about are everywhere. So when I was asked to show how my book, What’s for Lunch? can be used as a curricular resource in Ontario schools, all I could think was how the ideas in it are connected to everything.

I don’t think I’m completely off-base, though. Food, after all, is the great connector. What you eat is directly related to your health and the health of the planet. Food is the biggest industry on earth—growing, packaging, selling, etc.— so, naturally, it’s connected to the economy, the environment and social justice.

There are endless ways that creative educators can involve food (and, of course, What’s for Lunch?!) in their curriculum. In fact, more and more people (check out FoodShare’s Meredith Hayes’ CBC interview on the subject here) are calling for “fooderacy” to become an explicit part of the school system. After all, with obesity rates rising among young people, and diet-related health problems exploding, you could argue it’s essential to the well-being of our country.

The Stop Community Food Centre has recently produced a fabulous guidebook—the basis of its Grade 5 sustainable food systems workshops—and made it available to teachers and anyone else who needs help integrating food into their curriculum.

The book was originally designed as a take-away for the Grade 5 teachers who bring their kids to The Stop’s incredible Green Barn. But it will be an excellent resource for any teacher (in Canada or elsewhere) who’s interested in developing programs around food issues. It is especially good on that hardest of subjects: how food is connected to social justice. Divided into five units, it includes suggested activities, resources and personal stories. You can request a copy of the guide by emailing general@thestop.org

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